You are here

External authentication and SSO

Use this information to understand what we mean by External Authentication and how Single Sign-On (SSO) can be used with this authentication type.

What is external authentication?

Alfresco external authentication uses the Central Authentication Service (CAS), which enables Single Sign-On (SSO), and allows a user to authenticate with a CAS, instead of directly with Alfresco. For example, this might be using the mod_cas Apache module. For more information about mod_cas, see CAS Apache Module.

CAS is usually used with a proxy, for example, the Apache mod_proxy module.

External authentication is set with the authentication.chain parameter in your alfresco-global.properties file to use the external authentication subsystem.

To provide SSO, an external authentication system (or CAS) can be integrated with Alfresco. For example, the identity of the logged-in user is extracted by the CAS, passed to Alfresco servlets and extracted using the HttpServletRequest.getRemoteUser() method. As a result, when a user connects to Share they are shown their user dashboard, but will not see the Share login page.

The subsystem also allows a proxy user to be configured, so that requests made through this proxy user are made in the name of an alternative user, whose name is carried in a configured HTTP request header. This allows, for example, the Share application and other Alfresco Surf applications to act as a client to an SSO-protected Alfresco application and assert the user name in a secure manner.
Note: Activating external authentication makes Alfresco accept external authentication tokens. Make sure that no untrusted direct access to Alfresco's HTTP or AJP ports is allowed.
Note: A disabled user can still log in to Alfresco using external authentication.

Here are two scenarios where external authentication is configured with Alfresco and Share. In both scenarios, an HTTP or HTTPS request is sent to an authentication proxy. If authentication is OK, the proxy passes the request to Share using the AJP protocol.

In the first scenario, the Share endpoint-url (http://localhost:8080/alfresco/wcs) sends the request directly to Alfresco using HTTP and a User Header. No certificate is used and the external.authentication.proxyUserName is blank:
external.authentication.proxyUserName=
Alfresco trusts the header (defined by external.authentication.proxyHeader) sent by Share. This scenario is typically used if you want to prohibit direct access to Alfresco and enforce using the proxy, for example, by using firewall rules to the proxy.

A client uses either an HTTP or HTTPS protocol to an authentication proxy.  If authentication is OK,            the proxy passes the request to Share using the AJP protocol.             The Share endpoint-url (http://localhost:8080/alfresco/wcs) sends the request directly to the Alfresco layer using HTTP and a user header.            No certificate is used and the external.authentication.proxyUserName is blank. Alfresco trusts the header (defined by external.authentication.proxyHeader) sent by Share.

In the second scenario, the Share endpoint-url (http://your.server.com/alfresco/wcs) sends the request back to Apache, using HTTP and a User Header (defined by external.authentication.proxyHeader), and a certificate. external.authentication.proxyUserName is set:
external.authentication.proxyUserName=alfresco-system
Apache uses the certificate to check that the request is coming from Share with the correct user (that is, the value of external.authentication.proxyUserName) and forwards the request to Alfresco. This scenario is typically used to allow direct access to Alfresco, using HTTPS and the originator (the proxy) sends a client certificate when establishing the SSL tunnel.

A client uses either an HTTP or HTTPS protocol to an authentication proxy.  If authentication is OK,            the proxy passes the request to Share using the AJP protocol.             The Share endpoint-url (http://localhost:8080/alfresco/wcs) sends the request back to           Apache, using HTTP and a User Header (defined by         external.authentication.proxyHeader), and a certificate.         external.authentication.proxyUserName is         set. Apache uses         the certificate to check that the request is coming from Share with the correct user (that         is, the value of external.authentication.proxyUserName and forwards the         request to Alfresco.

Default authentication chain and Configuring external authentication provide more information on the parameter and the external authentication subsystem.

Using the external authentication subsystem means that:
  • The complexity of authentication moves to an external software layer (a proxy). Alfresco listens to the authenticated user name that it receives using a custom HTTP header, or it reads the CGI REMOTE_USER variable that can be passed using the AJP protocol. Configuring external authentication provides more information on configuring the external authentication subsystem.
  • Most of the responsibility for authentication is not controlled by Alfresco, but controlled by the external software layer. Unless there is a problem when the authenticated user name is transmitted to Alfresco, the issue is located in the external software layer. In these cases, work with your proxy vendor or implementer of the authentication proxy to resolve the issue.

How is Single Sign-On (SSO) related to external authentication?

SSO is a property of an authentication scheme. You can use more than one method to set up SSO. For example:
  • If you are using Kerberos, you can use either the kerberos authentication subsystem, or the external authentication subsystem with a proxy that handles Kerberos authentication.
  • If you are using NTLM, you can use either the alfrescoNtlm or passthru authentication subsystems, or the external authentication subsystem with a proxy that handles NTLM authentication.
  • If you are using CAS, you must use the external authentication subsystem with a proxy that handles CAS authentication.

In summary, external authentication and SSO are not interdependent: you can set up external authentication that is not SSO (for example, using an Apache proxy with a mod_auth_basic setting), and you can set up an SSO system that is not using the external authentication subsystem (for example, using the kerberos authentication subsystem).

See Authentication subsystem types for a listing of the authentication subsystems and the features that they support.